You should know

Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari has returned to Abuja after almost two weeks in Britain where he was treated for an ear infection. The 73-year-old flew to London on June 6 to see an ear, nose and throat specialist after two doctors in Nigeria recommended further evaluation “as a precaution,” his staff said. (VOA)

Somalia’s armed group al-Shabab has confirmed the death of a commander suspected of organising the 2015 attack on Kenya’s Garissa University that left 148 people dead. The killing of Mohamed Mohamud Ali, also known as Dulyadin, was announced by Somali officials on June 1, and al-Shabab confirmed his death with the release of an obituary on Saturday. (Al Jazeera)

The number of people displaced by conflict is at the highest level ever recorded, the UN refugee agency says. It estimates that 65.3m people were either refugees, asylum seekers or internally displaced at the end of 2015, an increase of 5m in a year. This represents one in every 113 people on the planet, the UN agency says. (BBC)

What we need

When heads of state from across Africa arrive in Kigali, Rwanda next month for the African Union (AU) Summit, they will be among the first Africans issued the new electronic African Union passport. The passport is meant to make travel on the continent much easier for Africans. (Quartz)

Biz Dev

African coding accelerator Andela, which recruits and trains software developers in Africa and embeds them into engineering organisations worldwide, has announced a US$24 million Series B funding round led by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. The investment in Andela is the first lead investment by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, launched by Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan to advance human potential and promote equality. (Techcabal)

Arts &
Culture &
Music&
Sports

A crowd of 50-70 people celebrated Juneteenth, the annual commemoration of the ending of slavery in the U.S., Saturday afternoon in Douglass Park.  The festivities featured exhibits of Missouri’s African-American history, which included artifacts, such as photographs and newspaper clippings. Many came to watch the performance by Kunama Mtendaji, an African-American folk artist, and another by a hip-hop dance group. (columbiamissourian.com)


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